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Atari 2600 Label VariationsAtari 2600 Label Variations

The 2600, by far, has the market cornered when it comes to label variations. Not only were a great deal of games released for the 2600, but due to the 2600's long lifespan, many games were sold for several years and were produced with several different labels. Most label collectors only seek out the major label variations for any given cartridge, while some go after every minor variation, of which there are quite a few. This list only contains major variations by each company, along with pictures so you can get a feel for what the differences are.

Atari produced more label variations than any other company, which isn't terribly surprising given that they produced more games for the 2600 than any other company. Quite a few carts produced by Atari are available on at least two major label variations, one being a Text label and the other being a Picture label. Other common label variations include the Blue label carts produced by Activision in their later years, the White label INTV versions of M Network carts, and the Sears Text/Picture variations (similar to Atari).

 
20th Century Fox
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardThis is the standard label for 20th Century fox. The top has the game's name in a stylized font appropriate for the title, and beneath that is the 20th Century Fox logo. Below that is some artwork depicting game action. About half of the 20th Century Fox games have the name of the game on the end label while the others only have copyright text on the end, making them harder to identify without looking at the main label.Click for More Info
Red SiriusFox wanted to be in the videogame business in a hurry, so they licensed a number of games from software company Sirius. These games have a red label with white lettering, and an artist's rendering of what the game screen looks like in the middle of the label. When Fox began producing their own games, they used their own standard label.Click for More Info


Absolute Entertainment
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardAbsolute cartridges don't particularly adhere to one standard. They have stylized fonts appropriate for the title, and have the Absolute Entertainment logo on the label. Some feature pictures on the label some don't. The end label has the name of the game, again in a stylized font. Absolute games come in an Activision case, complete with the Activision name embossed on the back. Be careful with F-14 Tomcat for the 2600 - many of these are mislabeled 7800 versions. The only way you can visibly discern the difference between the two carts is by looking at the edge connector (where the cartridge plugs into the 2600). The 7800 connector is wider than the 2600. The Atari 7800 will play both versions of course.Click for More Info


Activision
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardThe standard Activision label has a solid background color with white lettering and the Activision logo on top. In the middle is an artist's rendering of a game screen with some brief instructions and game options sometimes shown below the picture. The end label has the name of the game again in white. The label end of the case is grooved with small lines, and the Activision name is embossed on the back of the case. Many of these were later released in the Blue label style.Click for More Info
SpecialSpecial labels are those that do not adhere to the standard one-color-white-text style that most Activision cartridges use. These cartridges usually have artwork that covers most of the label, and the title is in a stylized font. The Activision logo is still somewhere on the front of the label. The end label has the name in a stylized font as well.Click for More Info
BlueThese labels came out of Activision's desire to cut costs late in the life of the 2600. Instead of the normal labels with nice fonts and multicolored pictures, Activision used a plain blue label with white text and no picture. A double-line border surrounds the text. The end label has the game title in this same plain font. Blue labels are slightly harder to find than their standard counterparts, but they aren't particularly rare.Click for More Info
WhiteMost of Activision's white labels were released in Europe as PAL variations of North American NTSC releases. It's likely they were used for the same reasons as the Blue labels - to reduced production costs. In fact, they are exactly like the blue labels except they are white, usually with black text (some have blue text).Click for More Info
BlackPicture Not Available


American Videogame
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardSince American Videogame only produced one game, Tax Avoiders, they only have a single label variation as well. It features a bright red label that wraps around to cover the end of the cartridge as well. The bulk of the label is occupied with a graphic, while the stylized Tax Avoiders name is featured on the front of the label as well as on the end. Credits for the game are actually listed in a small white font above the title. The game is contained in a Sega grip-style cartridge.Click for More Info


Amiga
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardClick for More Info


Apollo
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardThis was the first style Apollo used for its games - colorful labels with interesting artwork and white text. End labels match the color of the main label and repeat the title. Later, Apollo moved to cut costs and began releasing their games with simpler blue labels. Some games were released in both styles.Click for More Info
BlueApollo Blue labels all follow a similar format - a blue background with white text and a diagonally slashing picture. The logo is featured prominently on the main label, and the end label has the game title in white text between two gold bars. Not all games were released with this label, and some were released in both styles.Click for More Info


Atari
Label NameDescriptionImage
Text #When Atari launched the 2600 in 1977, they offered nine games for sale. These nine games had plain labels with colored text, and the end label had a number on it next to the game name. The number referred to the internal development number of the game - Combat being the first (01). These numbered games were sold in gatefold boxes - the front of the box opened outward like a book. Atari only sold their games in this style for a year - after that, they changed to standard boxes (open from the top) and text labels without the accompanying numbers. This makes the Text # label an interesting collectible, especially when paired with the box.Click for More Info
TextAtari Text labels were the first major standard that Atari used. These labels are very simple text featuring different colors for different games, on a black background. There is a gray border around the main label and end label. Many Text label games were also produced with a Picture Label.Click for More Info
PicturePerhaps the most common Atari label style, Picture labels were introduced in 1981, replacing the older text labels and were used throughout the remainder of the 2600's lifespan. They feature the same font as the Text label, but feature a game-related picture in the middle of the label. The end label simply states the game's name, and there is no border around either the main or end label. Many picture label titles also have text counterparts, and there are a few other anomalies as well (Silver Asteroids, Red Space Invaders and Yars' Revenge).Click for More Info
SilverAtari Silver labels were used between 1982 and 1985, and were produced alongside Picture label games that continued to be sold. Most Silver label games did not appear under other labels, with a few exceptions such as a Picture label Asteroids and a Red label Gravitar. The silver label variations of these two games are much harder to find. Silver labels have a silver or gray background with a picture in the middle, and the name in white letters across a red stripe. The end label is in red text on a black background.Click for More Info
Children'sChildren's label games are something of an odd assortment that don't really fit anywhere else. All of them have a grid pattern over a solid background with a picture in the lower middle of the label. The sub-category is shown on the upper left-hand corner of the cartridge - Children's Computer Workshop, Peanuts, Muppets, and Disney. The CCW games (Big Bird's Egg Catch, Cookie Monster Munch, and Alpha Beam with Ernie) have a yellow background with red text. Peanuts games (Snoopy and the Red Baron and the planned Good Luck, Charlie Brown) used the grid over a red background. The Muppets series (Pigs in Space and the planned Miss Piggy's Wedding) used the grid over a purple background. The Disney series (Sorcerer's Apprentice and the planned Donald Duck's Speedboat, Dumbo's Flying Circus, and Snow White) used the grid over a blue background. There was also a Garfield game that surfaced as a prototype that probably would have used the Children's style label as well.Click for More Info
RedAtari Red labels were produced from 1986-1990 when Atari was attempting to revive the system. These labels range in color between dark-red and red-brown. For the first year, the pictures were monochrome, then Atari switched to color pictures on the red background. The text is white, and the end label is red with white text as well. Some Red label games are re-issues of previous titles such as Gravitar and Space Invaders. Others were only released as a Red label. Atari also released all of their third-party licensed games with this label (Donkey Kong, Q*bert, etc.).Click for More Info


Avalon Hill
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardAvalon Hill cartridges have an unusual grooved casing with a wraparound label. There is a solid covered background with a picture and white text. The Avalon Hill logo appears at the bottom of the picture.Click for More Info


Bit Corp
Label NameDescriptionImage
Re-releasePicture Not Available
GermanPicture Not Available
EnglishPicture Not Available
FrenchPicture Not Available


Bomb
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardBomb cartridges are all fairly similar, with really only the title changed on the label from game to game. The label is blue, with Bomb in red lettering and the game name in yellow. The casing has the Bomb name embossed on the back, and there are small grips on the side.Click for More Info


CBS Electronics
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardCBS Games come in a gray Activision style casing without the Activision logo. Labels are black with yellow or white text and a the CBS name in white text against a red banner.Click for More Info
PALPicture Not Available
UK WhitePicture Not Available
UK ColorPicture Not Available
UK BlackPicture Not Available
German ColorPicture Not Available


Coleco
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardColeco games have a gray or white casing with grooves on the side near the end label, and a beveled underside with the Coleco logo embossed in the plastic. Labels have a black background with the game logo in color, and some informational text in white and yellow below that. The end label is black and with Coleco in white text along with the game's logo.Click for More Info


CommaVid
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardMost (all?) CommaVid cartridge cases are about an inch longer than a standard 2600 cartridge case. They don't all follow a set standard, but generally they have a wraparound label with a color picture and a solid color background. The CommaVid logo is on the main label. One exception is Magicard, which has a plain white label with generic CommaVid text on it. The name Magicard looks like it was simply typed on the label.Click for More Info


Data Age
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardData Age cartridges come in a black casing with an angled end for the game name. The label is silver with a picture in the middle and a stylized game logo.Click for More Info


DSD/Camelot
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardClick for More Info


Ebivision
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardEbivision labels are glossy with game artwork and title on the main label, along with the Ebivision logo on the bottom. The limited edition versions are numbered in the lower left-hand corner. Alfred Challenge does not have the Ebivision name on it because it was released before Ebivision was formed in an official capacity.Click for More Info


Epyx
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardEpyx games have simple labels on an Activision style case. Labels are white with blue text and do not feature a picture.Click for More Info


First Star Software
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardFirst Star only made one game for the 2600, Boing! It has a silver label with some pixilated artwork and titling, as well as the names of the programmers and designers. The Xonox version has a casing like a Xonox single ender - the case is wider at the top and the end is beveled.Click for More Info
XonoxFirst Star only made one game for the 2600, Boing! It has a silver label with some pixilated artwork and titling, as well as the names of the programmers and designers. The Xonox version has a casing like a Xonox single ender - the case is wider at the top and the end is beveled.Picture Not Available


Froggo
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardFroggo labels are of better quality than their games. Labels are white with monochrome text and a picture appropriate to the game theme.Click for More Info


HES
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardHES mainly distributed other company's games, and the labels come in many different forms. Usually, they are a single color background with the games name in simple text. Their only original game, My Golf, was apparently distributed by Salu and has a standard Salu label. It's a white background with black text. The casing feels like a softer plastic than most cases.Click for More Info


Imagic
Label NameDescriptionImage
TextImagic text labels have the same casing and style as Imagic picture label carts, but are a bit more plain in that they are lacking the picture shown on the box. The label is silver with a multicolored band upon which is written the game title and other information. The Imagic name is embossed on the end of the cartridge. Some Imagic games were produced with both types of labels, and both styles are sought after by label variation collectors.Click for More Info
PictureThe Imagic picture label style is noticeably different from the text labels in that they contain a flashy picture in the lower middle of the label. The game title is written in black across a multicolored band, and the Imagic name is embossed on the end of the cartridge. Some Imagic picture label games were also released in the text style. Most people prefer to have the picture label if given a choice, but some collectors seek both versions.Click for More Info


Intellivision Productions
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardThese recently produced games come in a standard case with colorful labels. The main label has game artwork and the game title, and the end label has the title again. The Intellivision Productions name appears at the bottom of the label.Click for More Info


INTV
Label NameDescriptionImage
WhiteINTV purchased the rights to MNetwork games from Mattel and released them with this white label. It consists only of a small end label, with black text on a white background. It is identical to the MNetwork version except for the color. There is no main label for these games. The unusual shape comes from the fact that the main portion of the case is an Intellivision cartridge case with an Atari-sized adapter on the end. INTV games came with black and white manuals in an attempt to cut costs.Click for More Info


K-Tel Vision
Label NameDescriptionImage
Standard K-Tel Vision cartridges come in an unusual T-shaped case, similar to Ultravision and MenAVision. The labels have the K-Tel name along with the game name, and four seemingly unrelated pictures. They are very odd.Click for More Info


Konami
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardKonami only released three games for the 2600 and all have the same style label. Casings have a rounded end with a black label and some game-related artwork in the middle of the label. The end label is white with colored text. These were released in Europe under the name Gakken.Click for More Info


M Network
Label NameDescriptionImage
BlackMNetwork labels only cover the end of the cartridge, there is no main label. It is a small black label with light blue lettering for the game title. The casing is made from an Intellivision cartridge mold with a 2600-size adapter on the end. This is almost identical to the INTV label/case except for the colors.Click for More Info


Milton Bradley
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardMilton Bradley only released two games, Spitfire Attack and Survival Run, and they both come with labels created in a similar style. However, it is common to find both of these games without an end label. Apparently Milton Bradley shipped these games with a set of stickers to be applied to the controller. On this sticker sheet was also an end label to be applied to the cartridge, but it would seem that many people never bothered. We therefore consider the cartridges with an end label to be a hair more valuable than those without.Click for More Info


Mystique
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardMystique games have a grid pattern against a solid background with some game related artwork in the middle. The Mystique name and game title appear on the main label, and the name is repeated again on the end. Mystique packaged their games in oversized gatefold boxes, inside which was a fake leather case that held the cartridge. There was even a lock and key to keep the youngsters from playing mom and dad's game.Click for More Info


Mythicon
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardMythicon labels are black with a picture in the middle surrounded by a white border. The title is in red text on both the main and end label. The cartridge is numbered in order of release in the upper left hand corner. Too bad their games aren't as good as their label artwork.Click for More Info


Panda
Label NameDescriptionImage
Wraparound LabelPanda released their cartridges in two formats - one with a single label that covers the main area and wraps around the end, and one with just an end label. Wraparound labels are either all white with black text and the Panda logo or white around the end with a color picture main label. Panda boxes are blue with white text and the black Panda logo, with some game art on the lower portion of the box. Panda games are very hard to find with nice labels, as apparently they used very cheap material. Boxes are also very difficult to find. If you have pictures of any other Panda games that came with wraparound labels, please contact us.Picture Not Available
End Label OnlySome Panda games only have an end label, with no main label at all. These are either maroon or black with white text. Panda boxes are blue with white text and the black Panda logo, with some game art on the lower portion of the box. Panda games are very hard to find with nice labels, apparently they used very cheap material. Boxes are also very difficult to find. If you have pictures of any of the other Panda games with this label style, please contact us.Click for More Info


Parker Brothers
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardAlmost all Parker Brothers cartridges fall into this category. They have an unusual angular casing with horizontal grooves and a trapezoidal gray label. There is a color picture of game artwork in the middle of the label, and the title and copyright information appears on the end label.Click for More Info
GrayOnly one cartridge falls in this category - G.I. Joe. This game was released with both a color picture label and a simple gray logo label. The color version seems a bit harder to come by and most collectors seem to prefer this because it's, well, more colorful.Click for More Info


Playaround
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardPlayaround cartridges are double-enders, but they are not as long as Xonox' cartridges. There is game art for each game and arrows to tell which side is which. There are plugs that cover each end of the cartridge for when it is not in use, and these have the game title on them as well. The cartridges were also packaged in small faux-leather cases inside the regular box that included a small lock and key to keep junior away from the adult games. Playaround packaging was quite nice, unfortunately (or maybe fortunately) their games were not.Click for More Info


Quelle
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardPicture Not Available
ShortPicture Not Available


Salu
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardSalu was really a distributor of games by other companies, but they typically used the same label style for all of them. They have a white background, with black text, and "Distributed by Salu" at the bottom. They usually have a copyright citing the developer's name as well, such as Activision in the case of Ghostbusters II.Click for More Info


Sears
Label NameDescriptionImage
TextSears was an early supporter of Atari, and they sold Atari merchandise under their own brand name. This included both hardware and software, and the Sears version was called Sears Tele-Games. All but three Sears games are simply repackaged Atari games (Steeplechase, Stellar Track, Submarine Commander). Sears cartridges can be found in Text and Picture varieties, and they are very similar to the Atari versions. Sears also released the first nine Atari games in unique gatefold boxes, but they did not make numbered labels like Atari did. Sears Text labels are black with TELE-GAMES in large font, followed by a listing of games on the cartridge. Some people mistakenly call these 'multi-carts', but they are just game variations and not any different from the Atari version. Many Sears cartridges can be found in both Text and Picture variations.Click for More Info
PictureSears was an early supporter of Atari, and they sold Atari merchandise under their own brand name. This included both hardware and software, and the Sears version was called Sears Tele-Games. All but three Sears games are simply repackaged Atari games (Steeplechase, Stellar Track, Submarine Commander). Sears cartridges can be found in Text and Picture varieties, and they are very similar to the Atari versions. Sears Picture labels are typically harder to find than their text counterparts, but not by much. They have a black background with a picture in the middle and colored title text on the main and end label. The Sears logo appears above the title on the main label. What makes some of the Sears games interesting to collect, is that while some of them simply reuse Atari artwork, others have all new artwork on the label, manual, and box. Sears titles are often harder to find than their Atari counterparts because they were only sold at Sears, which makes them challenging to acquire, especially boxed.Click for More Info


Sega
Label NameDescriptionImage
Grip CaseSega Grip case games usually have a white label with colorful text and some game artwork. The Grip case is different from the normal case because it has the Sega name embossed on the back of the cart, and there are some large grooves on the side near the end label that make it easier to grip the cartridge when inserting or removing it. Some Sega games come in Normal and Grip styles.Click for More Info
Standard CaseSega Normal case games usually have a white label with colorful text and some game artwork. The Normal case looks like an Activision case without any embossed name on the back. Some Sega games come in Normal and Grip styles.Click for More Info


Selchow & Righter
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardSelchow & Ricther/QDI only made one game, Glib, and it has a red label with yellow text and some game artwork. The case is similar to that of an Activision cartridge.Click for More Info


Spectravision
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardSpectravision labels are silver with colorful text. The cartridges have a main label and an end label, with some recessed grooves near the end label to give purchase when one is inserting or removing the cartridge. Outside of North America, Spectravision was known as Spectravideo.Click for More Info


Starpath
Label NameDescriptionImage
CassetteAll of Starpath's games were produced on cassettes. They use a standard cassette case with a colorful insert featuring game art and other information. The cassette itself also has a label, usually a solid color with black text.Click for More Info


Sunrise
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardSunrise only made one game for the 2600. Quest for Quintana Roo has a silver wraparound label that covers two-thirds of the cartridge front. There is no picture, just the game name and the Sunrise logo. The end label simply says "Quest"Click for More Info


Telegames
Label NameDescriptionImage
SilverTelegames labels are silver with black text, featuring a label that covers the main area and wraps around the end.Click for More Info


Telesys
Label NameDescriptionImage
Color HandleTelesys' Color Handle case has a color picture of game art on a black background. The end of the cartridge is beveled so like a handle making it easier to grab the cartridge. This style has a single label that wraps around the end of the cartridge.Click for More Info
Color StandardTelesys' Color Square style has the same color label as their Handle style, but uses a more standard square casing with no handle on the end. This style has separate main and end labels.Click for More Info
B&W StandardThe Telesys B&W Square label is the same as the Color Square label except that it is in black and white with no end label, only a main label.Click for More Info


Tigervision
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardTigervision cases come in different colors and feature colorful labels. The cases are rectangular, with beveling on both sides near the end label. The main label and end label are separate.Click for More Info


TNT Games
Label NameDescriptionImage
WhiteTNT only released one game, BMX Airmaster, but with two different labels. One is a fairly plain white label with blue text and the other is a more colorful red label with a picture of someone riding a BMX bike. The red label is harder to find. The Atari version of this game is very different, and looks like the standard Atari Red label.Click for More Info
RedTNT only released one game, BMX Airmaster, but with two different labels. One is a fairly plain white label with blue text and the other is a more colorful red label with a picture of someone riding a BMX bike. The red label is harder to find. The Atari version of this game is very different, and looks like the standard Atari Red label.Picture Not Available


U.S. Games
Label NameDescriptionImage
Beveled CaseThis style is similar to the Standard style, but the main label and end label are separate pieces. The end of the cartridge near the end label is beveled, making a handle that can be gripped to insert or remove the cartridge. Labels are white with some game art, with the game title in white text against a blue banner.Click for More Info
Standard CaseSimilar to the beveled style, except the label is a single wraparound piece. Labels are white with some game art, and the game title in white text against a blue banner.Click for More Info
BlackThese games were released with the US Games and Vidtec names, before the company switched to US Games only. These labels are black with white text and some game art. The label is a single wraparound style.Click for More Info


Unknown
Label NameDescriptionImage
Beagle BrothersThese cartridges carry the name "Beagle Brothers" on the label, although they were not produced by the similarly named Beagle Bros software developer who published home computer software in the 1980's. We have spoken to several ex-Beagle Bros employees who are unaware of any Atari 2600 carts produced by the company. We believe they are pirate carts originating in South America due to the nature of the circuit boards contained within. The "Beagle Brothers" name was likely used to capitalize on the popularlity of the brand at the time.

The games themselves are simply repackaged versions of existing titles from Activision, Atari, Parker Brothers, and other companies. Due to the simple nature of the labels, it is likely that reproductions of these cartridges are floating around. Beware of fakes in the collector market.
Picture Not Available
GreenPicture Not Available
Taiwan SimpleThese unlicensed games have a simple color label in a standard cartridge case, and the name of the game in white lettering on the end label. This type of label has shown up all over the world, and was used by several companies (Zellers for example). These games were either found loose, or in a generic box with no company name.Picture Not Available
Taiwan CooperWe have grouped these games together because of the similar box and cartridge styles. All boxes have a drawing on the front with a "New" logo above the drawing. The back of the box has some simple instructions and a mock screenshot. These games have been found in the US and in Europe, and they were made in Taiwan (according to the back of the box). The font on these cartridges is Cooper Black, hence our description of these as "Taiwan Cooper". We don't know who actually made them, or if there were any official distribution channels. We have listed these games as NTSC for the time being, although the games found in Europe play fine on PAL systems. We're not sure if they were actually distributed in both formats, or only one format that happens to work on both TV formats. If you have any further information about who made these or how they were distributed, please contact us.Picture Not Available
V CaseThese cartridges have a simple color label that is shorter than most, because the label area is smaller. The end label is simple white text on a black background. The top of the case has a series of ridges with a "V" shape cut out of them. They appear to be unlicensed games distributed in Europe.Picture Not Available
Video Game SPPicture Not Available
Fantastic GamePicture Not Available
Pet BoatPicture Not Available


VentureVision
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardVenture Vision's single game has a light blue label with dark blue text. The label wraps around the end and features game art on the main area.Click for More Info


Wizard Video
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardThe Wizard Video label is red with black text. The main and end label are separate, and there is some artwork on the main label. Wizard boxes are very hard to find.Click for More Info
No LabelHalloween was released with a standard Wizard Video label, and also without a label at all. We can only guess that Wizard was trying to cut costs and shipped out a number of games with no label. "Halloween" is often written in black marker across the main area of the cartridge (and sometimes misspelled).Click for More Info


Xonox
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardThe standard Xonox cartridge is a single-ender as opposed to the double-ender that Xonox also marketed. There is a single label, and the end of the cartridge is beveled down. It is also much wider at this end of the case than the opposite end. Labels are typically blue with game artwork, and the title in red is against a yellow banner. All the Standard case games were also released on Double-Enders.Click for More Info
Double EnderThe Double-Ender is two games in one - each end of the cartridge has a different game. These cartridges are about 2.5 inches longer than a standard cartridge, and the case is wider in the middle. There is one long label that is typically blue, with game art for both sides split diagonally down the middle. Titles are printed in red text against a yellow banner. All the titles found on the Double-Enders can also be found in standard single-ended cases.Click for More Info


Zellers
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardZellers games come in plain black cases with a separate main label and end label. The end label is black with white text, and the main label features game artwork. The Zellers name does not appear on the cartridge. Zellers boxes are red with white lettering with a large picture of game artwork. The Zellers name appears in plain text in the price box.Click for More Info


Zimag
Label NameDescriptionImage
StandardZimag labels are black wraparound style with game art and b&w text against a rainbow banner.Click for More Info